Suzuran no-waste kimono jacket pattern review

25

Leggi questo post in: Italiano

The Suzuran No-Waste Kimono Jacket pattern: a French-designed, Japanese-style spring kimono, perfect for warm weather. The best part? The unique pattern design uses every bit of a rectangle of fabric with no remaining scraps! A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

You may have noticed in my Me-Made-May 2015 documentation last week that there was one day that I was dressed considerably more fancy than usual, and that the me-made item had still not been blogged about. It was a special pattern that I had tested for a fellow designer, Julia from Tites Mains, and that pattern has now been released! (With a special discount code! Read on to find out more!) So I present to you the Suzuran No-Waste Kimono Jacket pattern!

The Suzuran No-Waste Kimono Jacket pattern: a French-designed, Japanese-style spring kimono, perfect for warm weather. The best part? The unique pattern design uses every bit of a rectangle of fabric with no remaining scraps! A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

Is this not such a cool jacket? That’s what happens when a French designer puts her own twist on a traditional Japanese Yukata, a spring kimono. I’ve worn it twice so far and got tons of compliments on it. “Suzuran” means lily of the valley, which in France symbolizes spring. And this is truly a wonderful garment for spring.

The Suzuran No-Waste Kimono Jacket pattern: a French-designed, Japanese-style spring kimono, perfect for warm weather. The best part? The unique pattern design uses every bit of a rectangle of fabric with no remaining scraps! A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

The 3/4 length sleeves cover up most of your arms to protect them, but the width of them and the (optional) underarm vents let air get in.

The Suzuran No-Waste Kimono Jacket pattern: a French-designed, Japanese-style spring kimono, perfect for warm weather. The best part? The unique pattern design uses every bit of a rectangle of fabric with no remaining scraps! A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

Unlike most jackets, there are no buttons, zippers or snaps. The front overlaps and is held in place with the wide obi-style belt. Other design elements are a rigid collar, unique front plackets and special twisted cuffs.

But the feature that will thrill all sewers is the no-waste element. Believe it or not, the various pattern pieces are all wedged in together, with smaller pieces fitting into the spaces left between larger ones, creating one large rectangle. So, when you assemble the various pages of the pattern, you pin it as it is onto a rectangle of fabric yardage and then cut the pattern pieces and the fabric out all at once. There is only one little piece of waste fabric from the neckhole, and besides that every single centimeter of fabric gets used. No weird-shaped scraps that you’ll never know how to use. You know exactly how much fabric to buy without any waste! I’d never seen a pattern like this before and I just LOVE this feature, especially if using expensive fabric!

The Suzuran No-Waste Kimono Jacket pattern: a French-designed, Japanese-style spring kimono, perfect for warm weather. The best part? The unique pattern design uses every bit of a rectangle of fabric with no remaining scraps! A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

So, would you like to try this one of a kind pattern out for yourself? I highly recommend it! You can buy the digital PDF pattern on Etsy or Craftsy*. The pattern is less expensive on Craftsy, but if you prefer Etsy, use the discount code “SUZURAN00” (valid only on Etsy) to get it for just $6 up til Monday, May 25th. So go buy it, cut it out without leaving scraps, sew it, and LOVE it! 🙂

*This post contains affiliate links.

25 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks for blogging about Suzuran, Lisa. I am really excited about this pattern – and the jackets I made for myself from them 😉 I am thinking the no-waste way is worth exploring further…

    • Wow, Agy, I had never heard of him, but what I’ve been able to find just now is absolutey fascinating! I’d love to learn more about this movement! Do you have any suggestions for places to start?

      • Si! Infatti sono mezzo italiana 😀 Ho un po perso la pratica per scrivere ma lo capisco molto bene 😉 M’interessa il tuo blog, fra tutte le altre qualità, per imparare la terminologia del cucito in italiano – non la conosco pure.

        • Non avevo idea! Ma non so quanto ti conviene imparare la terminologia del cucito da me. Spesso non so bene come dire le cose perché ho imparato e continuo ad imparare il cucito in inglese! :/

          • Vero, c’e molto più materiale in inglese sull’internet e sui libri… Basta vedere che scrivo in francese sul mio blog ma i miei cartamodelli (? patterns) sono tutti in inglese, perche non c’e un vero pubblico per quello in Francia.

            • Diciamo che non c’è molto in Italia per quanto riguardano i cartamodelli, ma è proprio per questo che li faccio (e faccio i miei tutorial sul sito) anche in italiano. Bisogna iniziare ad abituare le persone a questo tipo di cosa, e poi ci sarà sempre più spazio per materiali non in inglese! Almeno così penso io la cosa! 🙂

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here