How to make continuous bias tape in one long strip

8

Leggi questo post in: Italiano

Preparing the strips:

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson 8. Use your quilting ruler and a pen to draw a line 5 cm (2″) from the bottom edge of the parallelogram (top).

Sizing note: As I mentioned before, the size bias tape I use the most is 12.5mm (½”) double fold bias tape (which corresponds to 25mm [1″] single fold bias tape), so that’s what I’m showing here. If you are making another size, simple draw your lines twice the size of the bias tape maker/single fold bias tape width. So, for example, if you are making 18 mm (3/4″) single fold bias tape (9 mm [3/8″] double fold bias tape), your lines should be 36 mm (1½”) from the edge.

Save this Cucicucicoo project on Pinterest9. Continue drawing lines 5 cm (2″) from each other until you get to the top edge. Then trim off the extra amount at the top (bottom picture above).

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson 10. Rotate the parallelogram 90° to the right so that the seam is vertical. Draw a line 1 cm from the top and bottom edges, as shown in the pictures above.

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson 11. Flip the fabric right side up (with the seam still vertical) and pull the bottom edge up to the top edge, matching up the lines 1 cm from the edges.

VERY IMPORTANT!! This will make or break this technique! You need to be very careful to not fold the parallelogram perfectly in half, but slightly to the side so that the lines create a spiral.

Notice in the top picture above that the first 5 cm line on the bottom left needs to match up with the top left corner, NOT the top 5 cm line. The second 5 cm line on the bottom left matches up with the first 5 cm line on the top left, and so on.

12. Pin the edges together. It will be wonky, don’t worry. But look below to make sure that it’s lined up properly.

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson You need to make sure that you’re pinning the points where the 1 cm and 5 cm lines meet on each edge. My trick for making sure that they’re lined up right is to stick a pin in the point from the front and make sure that it comes out at the same intersection on the back (black pin in the pictures above), and then I continue pushing the pin through the fabric the second time to keep it in place as you normally would (red pin in the pictures above).

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson 13. Sew along the 1 cm line. You now have a tube of fabric! Iron open this second seam (shown above by the arrows). I suggest you use a sleeve ironing board to slip the tube around when ironing.

That might sound confusing, but I promise that once you figure out the skewed spiral, it’s actually quite simple. Now comes the most fun part!

Cutting the strips and making the tape:

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson 14. With the fabric tube still inside out, cut along the line, around and around and around. Again, I suggest using a collapsible sleeve ironing board to keep the tube straight and avoid accidentally cutting through more than one layer.

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson And just look at that pile of a long, continuous bias strip! Snip off the funny little bit sticking off of the ends of the strip.

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson 15. Now all you have to do is pull the strip through the bias tape maker, ironing it as it comes out the other end. Wrap your new single fold bias tape around a piece of cardboard or flattened toilet paper tube to store it. If you need double fold bias tape, just fold it in half so that the folded edges meet and iron, wrapping it around the cardboard.

(Read my lesson on how to use a bias tape maker here for more information on how to use this very useful tool!)

Now that you know how to make continuous bias tape, make a whole bunch in your favorite colors and prints! I have a really fun new project coming up which they’ll be perfect for!

Learn how to use bias tape, one of the most useful sewing notions! Find out how to make it and various ways to use it, with free projects, tutorials and patterns! #biastapeThis sewing lesson on how to make continuous bias tape is part of the Cucicucicoo Bias Tape Series! Make sure you check out all the other lessons, projects and patterns using bias tape in different ways!

Save this Cucicucicoo project on PinterestAnd don’t forget to Pin this post so you’ll know how to find it when you need it! (And you know that you’ll need it!)

How awesome is it to have homemade bias binding that matches your project perfectly! Learn how to make continuous bias tape easily with just two seams without wasting fabric! #biastape #sewinglesson This lesson on how to make continuous bias tape (and the rest of the Bias Series) is part of the syllabus of Cucicucicoo’s Learn to Machine Sew beginner’s sewing course! Don’t forget to share pictures of your work on Facebook or the Cucicucicoo Creations Flickr Group!

Learn to Machine Sew with Cucicucicoo: a free sewing course for beginners*All starred links are affiliate links which help fund this blog. All opinions are my own.
Please read my affiliate link disclosure for more information.

8 COMMENTS

  1. Great explanation! I just used this exact technique for a recent project requiring bias tape and was going to post about the “how to” later. (Yeah, you beat me to it.) It is a timesaver compared to cutting and sewing strips, isn’t it?

    • Oh YES, Rochelle! Once I learned this technique, I just don’t have the patience to cut and sew every single strip anymore! And there’s something that’s just so satisfying about cutting out along that tube that one massively long strip, don’t you find?! Haha! Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

  2. Perfetto! Un po’ complicato la prima volta, ho sbagliato le linee di giunzione ho messo la prima sulla prima e non sulla seconda, ma si rimedia facilmente e dagli errori si impara! Dopo aver sprecato molta stoffa per fare gli sbiechi, adesso con questo metodo ottimizzo sia la stoffa che i tempi e poi la cosa bella è che stoffe insignificanti sbiecate diventano bellissime. Ho smesso di spendere un mucchio di soldi per comprare gli sbiechi per rifinire i miei lavori patchword, rigorosamente fatti con stoffe di riciclo, come deve essere, e così li personalizzo al massimo.
    Sei un mito!!!!

    • Wow, bravissima Mariella! Mi sa che succede a tutti la prima volta allineare male quelle linee ma, come dici tu, bisogna sbagliare a volte per imparare! Quante volte ho sbagliato a fare lo sbieco per imparare! Una volta avevo una stoffa già sullo sbieco, ho fatto questa tecnica e mi sono resa conto solo alla fine di aver fatto… un non-sbieco perché era sul drittofilo!! Gahhh!!

      E hai assolutamente ragione, che una stoffa che magari non ti piace per niente può diventare proprio bella come sbieco! L’ho sperimentato più volte! 🙂

  3. Jewl I don’t quite get it either. But I’m new to sewing and I never took geometry!! Can you believe that??!! But I’m sure a video would help tremendously.! Thanks for the information!!

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here