Tepore knit wrist warmers

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Leggi questo post in: Italiano

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

My friend Maria of Maria Modeo Handmade in Italy is an amazing knitter, designer and teacher. She’s helped me numerous times with my knitting issues and is incredibly knowledgeable about all things yarn-related. I already posted last year about her bandana-style neckwarmer pattern, and will post in the springtime about a summer sweater I sewed from a course of hers. The first course of hers I took, however, was for the Tepore wrist warmer pattern. (update: which is now available also in English!)

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

While most wrist warmers feature a little tube for the thumb, the Tepore pattern has a simple thumb opening, which is really easy and therefore ideal for beginner knitters like myself.

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

I’d wanted to knit wrist warmers or fingerless gloves for a while and also wanted to learn more about using double pointed needles, so I jumped at the opportunity to learn from Maria’s course. I was surprised at just how easy it is to use this type of needle when working in the round once you get everything started. (Image above taken from my Instagram account. Are you following me there yet?!)

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

This pattern is worked in the round, mostly in stockinette stitch, except where the thumbhole is. The stitches in that area are slightly looser than in the rest, so that’s something I need to work on in the future.

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

An additional feature is embroidery along the garter stitch in a contrasting color, although it’s completely optional. I decided to buy a second color of the same yarn to make two matching pairs in my two favorite colors: avocado green and purple!

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

I used Lanecardate Lamora yarn, 75% superfine wool, 25% angora. It is amazingly soft and warm, and not at all itchy.

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

The model is meant to fit snugly and it has to get pulled on over a medium-sized hand with a little bit of coaxing. They are, however, still quite comfortable, though if I were to knit these again, I’d probably use 3.5 mm needles instead of 3 mm to make them a little larger.

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

I added a couple extra rows to the thumbhole in the purple pair to make it wider, but I don’t think it’s really all that necessary.

Tepore knit wrist warmers: a simple pattern with simple thumb openings, worked in the round on double pointed needles. A review by www.cucicucicoo.com

Conclusion? This is a really easy pattern, great for beginners, and makes really snuggly and useful wrist warmers. Two thumbs up!

You can find my version of these wrist warmers on my Ravelry notebook and you can download the pattern here on Ravelry.

And if you prefer a super quick no-knitting version of these, check out my wristwarmers made from refashioned socks!

10 COMMENTS

  1. Hi Lisa, both pairs look lovely and the contrasting embroidery gives them and extra touch!
    May I suggest, as your next step in circular knitting, the Magic Loop method? It uses a single, long circular needle, and I find it much easier and less cumbersome than double pointed needles.

    • Thanks for the tip, Paola! I actually do use circular needles and MUCH prefer them to dpns, however this pattern was given as the exercise in a course on how to use double pointed needles, so that’s why I used them. Next I need to take a lesson on Magic Loop, because the one time I attempted it was total disaster!!

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