Making Good: Creative patches for jeans

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Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

In January I participated in Green Issues by Agy’s blog train “I didn’t throw it away,” which was all about why you keep certain items for decades. It was really interesting to read what was important to the participants and most of us tended to keep things embedded with emotional value.

So I was really excited to take part in Agy’s new blog train, Making Good,” in which participants write a tutorial about how to fix something and why they decided to fix it. I’m really looking forward to learning how to repair a whole variety of things! Yesterday Agy wrote about using a substance called Polymorph to fix a plastic water jug, and today is my day to participate with a clothing fix that is super useful: fixing rips and tears with creative patches for jeans!

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

Everyone loves wearing jeans, but the production process for them is actually very harmful to the environment, in terms of water usage, pesticides used on cotton plants, and the dyes polluting water. So this is why I like to keep our jeans useful for as long as possible. Then, of course, there’s also the fact that well-worn jeans are way more comfortable than new ones!

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

I’ve already written a tutorial on machine darning holes in jeans, and I use that technique VERY frequently. But sometimes it’s nice to add a bit of pizzazz to your repairs, and that’s when you can go all out with creative patches!

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

And how much fun is it to make patches for kids?! My little boy was thrilled to wear his “new” pants!

Save this Cucicucicoo project on Pinterest

You can, of course make classic patches with regular appliqué shapes (see my tutorial for that here), but I sometimes like to make patches even more visually interesting with the technique of reverse appliquè! Let me show you how!

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

1. Decide what shape patch you’d like, use tailor’s chalk to draw it on the fabric, and cut the shape out. I used three glasses to trace the cut-out shapes on my jeans. I decided to cut out two other circles just to add to the effect, even if there weren’t rips in those spots.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

2. Trace the same exact shape out on some scrap fabric. You can choose matching fabric or contrast fabric, depending on the looks you’re going for. I used quilting cotton, so I used two layers to make it more sturdy. You can trace the same object you traced before (the glasses, in my case) or trace around the piece of fabric you cut out.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

3. Cut at least 1 cm outside of your chalk tracing line (left) and serge or zig zag around the edges to keep them from fraying and to keep multiple layers together (right). The more space you leave outside the traced line, the easier it is to position inside the fabric, however there will also be more excess fabric against your skin.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

4. Position the patches inside the pants leg behind each hole, matching up the grainlines, and pin in place (left).

5. Carefully sew around the edge of each shape to keep it in position (right).

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

A little note here: People have asked me frequently how I manage to sew inside pants legs, for example for machine darning or for my vine-embellished jeans. I will be honest– it is not always easy. You definitely need to use your machine’s free arm. (Not sure what that is? Read about it here!) But even then it’s not always possible to access the mid-leg region. You have three options:

  1. You can open up the side seams and then sew them back up afterwards, but I don’t like to do that with industrial-made jeans.
  2. You can hand sew (which I did for the fish patch, which I’ll show you after).
  3. You just scrunch up the fabric the best you can and sew VERY slowly and carefully, stopping frequently to make sure that no extra fabric got stuck underneath. I generally use this third option and, as you can see in the picture above, it can be a bit chaotic.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

Stopping frequently can also make your stitches not perfectly even, but if you use a matching thread color, nobody will ever notice! I chose to sew around each patch twice because the raw edges will fray a lot and that way I don’t have to worry about the patch coming out.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

I sewed the fish patch slightly differently. Because of the funny shape, I used a rectangle of scrap fabric. I pinned the patch in place before cutting out the shape, hand-stitched around the chalk outline with embroidery thread, and then cut out the main fabric along the chalk line. I then added little bubbles in another color.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

You can see that I’m not the best embroiderer in the world and my stitches are far from even, but they do the trick! (I used a backstitch.)

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

I let my son choose the fabric and thread colors, and he chose the same striped fabric that I used for one of my finger pocket fish. (The same sheet fabric that I used for this box-pleated skirt and these kid pants.)

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

The result is repaired clothing, but what I love about this technique is that it’s so versatile and you can really express yourself with it! In my case, I managed to save one of the few pairs of pants I have that is actually long enough for me, but I also saved them from the fate of a blah garment, adding an element of visual interest to them that fits in with my personality!

Here you can see me on May 1st for the first day of my Me-Made-Me 2015 challenge. Just to stick with the reverse applique theme, I also wore my Alabama Chanin-style layered reverse appliqué shirt refashion.

Making Good: Fix rips and tears in pants with creative patches for jeans! Use reverse appliquè for imaginative repairs! www.cucicucicoo.com for www.greenissuessingapore.blogspot.com

And this type of a fix can also stand up to the wear and tear of a 4-year-old boy’s adventures!

So, what do you think? Would you make this type of fix to your garments, or do you prefer a more hidden method to repairing?

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 photo MakingGood_zpsizxmugcf.png

This post is part of a blog train hosted by Agatha from Green Issues by Agy  on “Making Good”. What is repair, and why do we even bother to repair the things we have?  Some see repair as a way of reconnecting with our possessions as we extend their lives. Others see it as a form of creative potential and an avenue to express their craft.  The rewards for mending varies from feeling immense satisfaction to prolonging the life of the product. Follow the “Making Good” blog train this month and see what we have repaired and reconnected with. Have you mended anything today?

Millie from 2 Crochet Hooks, the next participant in the Making Good blog trainTomorrow Millie from 2 Crochet Hooks will show us her fix. Millie and her daughter Kristina make a fantastic mother-daughter team, sharing fun crochet and craft tutorials. They focus a lot on children’s activities and upcycling, which are two things that I just love! Every month they host a new craft challenge, using a different recycled materials and they also sell a whole bunch of unique crochet designs, including some really awesome kid costumes!

Here is the list of all the participants, so be sure to check them out on their scheduled day!

3 May –  Millie www.2crochethooks.com
4 May – Stella www.purfylle.com
13 May – Brandi, www.supergirlsavings.com/
14 May – Carrie www.curlycraftymom.com/ 
15 May – Deborah www.urbannaturale.com/
18 May  Taking a Break!
19 May –  Maegan www.maeandk.com 
20 May – Judith www.juicygreenmom.ca/
23 May – Julia  www.sumoftheirstories.com 
24 May – Amanda www.craftyfrugalmom.com
25 May – Diane www.VintageZest.com
26 May – Emily, www.theinnovativemama.com
27 May – Emmy  www.emmymom2.com  
28 May –  Vanessa   www.diy180site.blogspot.sg/ 
29 May – Jean Chua www.jeanstitch.wordpress.com/

33 COMMENTS

  1. Oooh, I love your cute jean patches. It is difficult getting the patches on in the trouser legs so I really appreciate the tips! Thank you for joining the blog train 🙂

    • Yeah, a bunch of people have asked me how I get into the pants legs, so I realized that I needed to specify how I do it! Thanks for having me, Agy! I’m excited to see the other posts in the blog train! 🙂

    • Thanks, Vicky! I wish I had a better way of explaining how to coach the fabric through, but I don’t, so hopefully the picture gives the idea of how to squash the fabric in there!

  2. love these patches and the tute is spot on (no pun intended). So not ordinary!! I have a pair of the grandson’s jeans here we were going to turn into shorts but now I want to add a dinosaur or something instead!!

    • I actually had hand-mended the rip on these pants twice, and both times they ripped again the next day just outside of the mended area. I also had intended to make these into shorts, but was hoping they would last just a *little* longer until it’s warm enough to wear shorts. I have a massive pants shortage because they all have rips in the knee!!

  3. These patches are so colorful and chic and trust me I have a lot of scrap fabric AND a lot of holy jeans and pants thanks to some active kids!! I really like the idea of adding fun shapes, how creative! Thank you for sharing this and I am really enjoying this blog chain.

    Carrie
    curlycraftymom.com
    Joining the blog train on May 14!

    • Thanks, Carrie! Yes, my active little boy rips through EVERYTHING!! I wanted to make these into shorts, but I have absolutely NO pants left for him until the hotter weather arrives, so I was forced to do something about it!

  4. I’ve mended SO many holes in jeans knees over the years! They would normally (but not always ) last my oldest lad, but then they would pass to my younger son and they wouldn’t stand a chance! I feel a little ashamed though, I only ever did very boring patches, plain denim underneath and a lot of stitches – your idea is SO much more fun!

    • Some kids just seem to wear through clothing at the speed of light, right? Actually, with my little guy you could say the same thing also for toys and pretty much anything else he comes in contact with! Ha! Don’t feel ashamed… it’s already great that you did any patches at all, especially because it’s frustrating to put work into something that could potentially get worn out again relatively soon again! 🙂

  5. Such a great solution for tears and holes! I am not the worn out jean kind of girl so I am excited for your smart repair! It can go very cute or very sophisticated depending on the fabric or design of the patch. LOVE your repair!

  6. stasera inizio a rammendare tutti i pantaloni dei miei demonietti!!! ero stufa di comprare toppo costose e anonime, ma questo tuo blog mi ha entusiasmata ed illuminata!!!!grazie sei meravigliosa

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